gofarther.me

Home » Italy » In the Umbrian Hills

In the Umbrian Hills

This day took us to the premier Umbrian hill town, Orvieto. We arrived in the train station, walked across the small city park and boarded a funicular (hill-side tram) for the several hundred foot ascent of the rock formation upon which sits the beautiful hill town of Orvieto. The rich brown tones of the homes and businesses that lined the narrow streets of this medieval bastion blended well with the golds, blues and yellows of the pottery that filled the shops and flowed out into the streets. All along the way trattorias and osterias invited one to linger under large canopies for a cool drink and a bite to eat.

The pre-Roman Etruscans started the city and left behind some ruins. Today, however, the beautiful cathedral on the highest point of the hill draws visitors from around the world to view the richly decorated exterior, considered by many to be the most beautiful building exterior in the country. That is not to imply that the interior is of less importance. Frau Angelico and Lucca Signorelli, among others, painted marvelous frescoes within. The pipe organ is also breathtaking in gold and white with wondrous carved angels.

I wish we had more time to stay in this charming, romantic, idyllic Italian locale. Perhaps we can return another day to walk the walls and view the wide expanse of country with vineyards that lay out from this high hill. Tomorrow we head into Rome to greet additional friends, the Berg’s, who will join the Krahn’s and us on our sojourn. WEG

Fresco by Frau Angelico in the Duomo (cathedral) in Orvieto, Italy

Fresco by Frau Angelico in the Duomo (cathedral) in Orvieto, Italy

The Clock of Maurizio, the first automated clock of its kind to regulate working hours in the beautiful hill town of Orvieto, Italy: Etruscan, medieval, and also modern

The Clock of Maurizio, the first automated clock of its kind to regulate working hours in the beautiful hill town of Orvieto, Italy: Etruscan, medieval, and also modern

The fresco of Lucca Signorelli's resurrection scene in the Chapel of San Brizio in Orvieto's Duomo (cathedral)

The fresco of Lucca Signorelli’s resurrection scene in the Chapel of San Brizio in Orvieto’s Duomo (cathedral)


3 Comments

  1. paul martin says:

    you trip looks wonderful,tell dan and charlotte ,hi !!- love,
    paul and Alison

  2. Roger Tornga says:

    Feels peaceful as compared to the rapid, driven pace of Houston.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: